Ishikawa Ryuji

写真a

Title

Professor

Researcher Number(JSPS Kakenhi)

60315455

Date of Birth

1965

Laboratory Address

1 Senbaru,Nishihara,Okinawa

Mail Address

E-mail address

Current Affiliation Organization 【 display / non-display

  • Concurrently   University of the Ryukyus  

  • Duty   University of the Ryukyus   Faculty of Global and Regional Studies   international language culture program   Professor  

External Career 【 display / non-display

  • 2009.04
     
     

    University of the Ryukyus, Faculty of Law and Letters, Department of Languages and Cultures, Professor  

Research Interests 【 display / non-display

  • English Literature,Contemporary British Literature,Irish Literature

Research Areas 【 display / non-display

  • Humanities & Social Sciences / English literature and literature in the English language

  • Humanities & Social Sciences / Foreign language education

  • Humanities & Social Sciences / European literature

Research Theme 【 display / non-display

  • W.B. Yeats The Poetics of the Wind

  • Mysticism and William Butler Yeats

Published Papers 【 display / non-display

  • The Role and Significance of Learning Outcome Assessment in Quality Assurance

    Ishikawa Ryuji, Takahashi Nozomi

      ( 3 ) 1 - 7   2019.03 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

  • Noli me Tangere: TheWind Touched in “Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen"

    Ishikawa Ryuji

    Studies in Regional Culture ( Okinawa International University )  ( 18 ) 77 - 88   2017.03 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

     View Summary

    This paper examines the trope of W.B. Yeats's double-intersecting spirals in the phrase, “the labyrinth of the wind" that appears in “Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen." In A Vision, Yeats introduces two intersecting cones as the principal symbol of his esoteric symbolism, and the most complicated and interesting characteristic of the symbol is the kinetic tension between the two gyrating cones. Yeats regards the kinetic cycle of the two spirals as the innermost principle of the revolving universe including individual life and human history. This discussion focuses on the ambiguous trope of “the labyrinth of the wind" that appears in “Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen." The poem is dominated by the spiral imageries like whirling and dancing. “The labyrinth of the wind" is one of them, and to “touch" the wind is the key word to pursuing the double spirals in the trope. This paper will explore the meaning of the touching of the wind and the diversity it unfolds in the trope of “the labyrinth of the wind."

  • Innovative Assessment for Collaborative Learning: The Antithetical Rubrics

    Yogi Minako, Ishikawa Ryuji

    6th International Conference on Education and Humanities and Social Sciences Studies (EHSSS-17) Proceedings   ( 17 ) 48 - 50   2017.03 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (international conference proceedings)

  • The Poetics of the Wind: The Vortex of the Twenty-first Century

    Ishikawa Ryuji

    Studies in Regional Culture ( Okinawa International University )  ( 16 ) 23 - 35   2015.03 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

     View Summary

    This paper aims to explore the trope of the vortex in the works of an American poet, Burt Porter. This is a part of the study of the poetics of the wind. The poetics of the wind is to elucidate the essential ideas underlying literary discourses of the wind. The study of the poetics has been developed along the dichotomy of the two carnal tropes: “harp" and “vortex." This paper focuses on the latter trope. The trope of the “harp" represents the synthetic order since the ancient Greek mythologies, while that of the vortex stands for the generative order in which diverse essentials find their ways of uniting each other. From the beginning of the twentieth century, the trope of the vortex became eminent as if the trope synchronized itself with the pluralistic sense of the world. The transition from the synthetic order to the generative order can be considered to correspond to a paradigm shift of the world order in which people have been more actively participating in structuring the idea of the world. The wind represents the invisible but essential order underlying the world. This paper examines the poems of Burt Porter to investigate how the trope of the vortex works in the twenty-first century.

  • A Unifying Trope of Fragmented Universe: Coleridge's “The Eolian Harp"

    Ishikawa Ryuji

    Studies in Regional Culture ( Okinawa International University )  ( 11 ) 19 - 32   2009.03 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

     View Summary

    This paper aims to elucidate the essential role the trope of Aeolian harp played in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's idea of “the one Life," one of the major concepts of the English Romanticism. When “The Eolian Harp" was first published, the phrase “the one Life" did not appear. The famous phrase was for the first time added to the poem. in 1817, more than twenty years later. During the intervening years, Coleridge's philosophy about nature had evolved into maturity, and one of the fruits was the concept of “the one Life." It is natural, therefore, that the revision of the poem be examined in terms of his philosophical development. Critics have not been discussed why Coleridge employed “The Eolian Harp," rather than another new poem, as the special venue to express his philosophical epiphany. This paper identifies the specific function of the Aeolian harp in Coleridge's “the one Life" philosophy by examining its role in unifying nature and the human mind.

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SDGs 【 display / non-display

  • 風の詩学:螺旋と竪琴 SDGs教育のグローバル質保証体制の確立