TAKAHASHI Shunichi

写真a

Title

Professor

Researcher Number(JSPS Kakenhi)

80620153

Laboratory Address

3422 Sesoko, Motobu, Okinawa 905-0227, Japan

Mail Address

E-mail address

Laboratory Phone number

+81-98-047-2997

Current Affiliation Organization 【 display / non-display

  • Duty   University of the Ryukyus   Tropical Biosphere Research Center   Professor  

  • Concurrently   University of the Ryukyus   Graduate School of Engineering and Science   Professor  

University 【 display / non-display

  • 1993.04
    -
    1997.03

    University of the Ryukyus   Faculty of Science   Graduated

Graduate School 【 display / non-display

  • 1997.04
    -
    1999.03

    University of the Ryukyus  Graduate School, Division of Science and Engineering  Master's Course  Completed

  • 1999.04
    -
    2002.03

    University of the Ryukyus  Graduate School, Division of Science and Engineering  Doctor's Course  Completed

External Career 【 display / non-display

  • 2002.04
    -
    2003.03

     

  • 2003.04
    -
    2006.03

     

  • 2006.04
    -
    2008.03

     

  • 2008.04
    -
    2010.12

     

  • 2011.01
    -
    2014.09

     

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Research Interests 【 display / non-display

  • サンゴ

  • 褐虫藻

  • 共生

  • 白化

  • 地球温暖化

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Published Papers 【 display / non-display

  • Moonrise timing is key for synchronized spawning in coral Dipsastraea speciosa

    Lin CH, Takahashi S, Mulla A, Nozawa Y

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   118 ( 34 ) e2101985118   2021.08 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

  • Photo-movement of coral larvae influences vertical positioning in the ocean

    Mulla AJ, Lin CH, Takahashi S, Nozawa Y

    Coral Reefs   40   1297 - 1306   2021.06 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

  • Chloroplast acquisition without the gene transfer in kleptoplastic sea slugs, Plakobranchus ocellatus

    Maeda T, Takahashi S, Yoshida T, Shimamura S, Takaki Y, Nagai Y, Toyoda A, Suzuki Y, Arimoto A, Ishii H, Satoh N, Nishiyama T, Hasebe M, Maruyama T, Minagawa J, Obokata J, Shigenobu S

    eLife   10   10:e60176   2021.04 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

  • Loss of symbiont infectivity following thermal stress can be a factor limiting recovery from bleaching in cnidarians

    Kishimoto Mariko, Baird Andrew H., Maruyama Shinichiro, Minagawa Jun, Takahashi Shunichi

    ISME JOURNAL ( SPRINGERNATURE )  14 ( 12 ) 3149 - 3152   2020.12 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

     View Summary

    Increases in seawater temperature can cause coral bleaching through loss of symbiotic algae (dinoflagellates of the family Symbiodiniaceae). Corals can recover from bleaching by recruiting algae into host cells from the residual symbiont population or from the external environment. However, the high coral mortality that often follows mass-bleaching events suggests that recovery is often limited in the wild. Here, we examine the effect of pre-exposure to heat stress on the capacity of symbiotic algae to infect cnidarian hosts using the Aiptasia (sea-anemone)-Symbiodiniaceae model system. We found that the symbiont strainBreviolumsp. CS-164 (ITS2 type B1), both free-living and in symbiosis, loses the capacity to infect the host following exposure to heat stress. This loss of infectivity is reversible, however, a longer exposure to heat stress increases the time taken for reversal. Under the same experimental conditions, the loss of infectivity was not observed in another strainBreviolum psygmophilumCCMP2459 (ITS2 type B2). Our results suggest that recovery from bleaching can be limited by the loss of symbiont infectivity following exposure to heat stress.

  • Arabidopsis BSD2 reveals a novel redox regulation of Rubisco physiology in vivo

    Tominaga Jun, Takahashi Shunichi, Sakamoto Atsushi, Shimada Hiroshi

    PLANT SIGNALING & BEHAVIOR ( TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC )  15 ( 4 ) 1740873   2020.04 [ Peer Review Accepted ]

    Type of publication: Research paper (scientific journal)

     View Summary

    Plants need light energy to drive photosynthesis, but excess energy leads to the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative inactivation of target enzymes, including the photosynthetic CO2-fixing enzyme, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). It has been demonstrated in vitro that oxidatively inactivated Rubisco can be reactivated by the addition of reducing agents. Busch et al. (in The Plant Journal, doi: 10.1111/tpj.14617, 2020) recently demonstrated that bundle-sheath defective 2 (BSD2), a stroma-targeted protein formerly known as a late-assembly chaperone for Rubisco biosynthesis, can be responsible for such reactivation in vivo. Here, we propose a working model of the novel redox regulation in Rubisco activity. Redox of Rubisco may be a new target for improving photosynthesis.

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Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research 【 display / non-display

  • Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(B)

    Project Year: 2020.04  -  2023.03 

    Direct: 12,200,000 (YEN)  Overheads: 3,660,000 (YEN)  Total: 15,860,000 (YEN)

  • How does the interspecific variation of leaf traits affect the acclimation capacity of plants?

    Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(B)

    Project Year: 2020.04  -  2023.03 

    Direct: 13,900,000 (YEN)  Overheads: 4,170,000 (YEN)  Total: 18,070,000 (YEN)

  • Understanding the biological function of fluorescent proteins in corals

    Challenging research (sprout)

    Project Year: 2018.06  -  2021.03 

    Direct: 4,100,000 (YEN)  Overheads: 1,230,000 (YEN)  Total: 5,330,000 (YEN)

  • Identification of factors regulating the species specificity in coral-algae symbiosis

    Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research

    Project Year: 2015.04  -  2017.03 

    Member: TAKAHASHI Shunichi

    Direct: 3,000,000 (YEN)  Overheads: 900,000 (YEN)  Total: 3,900,000 (YEN)

     View Summary

    Many cnidarians, including reef-building corals and sea anemones, harbor endosymbiotic dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium), and each host species typically associates with specific Symbiodinium phylotypes. Here we propose a new model to explain the symbiont specificity for the host in cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. We examined the relationship between infectivity and cell size of different cultured Symbiodinium strains using a model cnidarian host, sea anemone Aiptasia. Results showed that, of the fifteen Symbiodinium strains tested, the largest four strains failed to infect. Further experiments using two different coral species demonstrated that the acceptability of large-sized Symbiodinium strains differs between coral species. These results demonstrate that species specificity is determined by the cell size (symbiont) and the maximum threshold for symbiont cell size (host).

  • Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows

    Project Year: 2003.04  -  2006.03 

    Direct: 3,300,000 (YEN)  Total: 3,300,000 (YEN)

Other External funds 【 display / non-display

  • Project Year: 2012  -  2014 

    Member: TAKAHASHI Shunichi  Offer Organization: Australian Research Council

    Total: 30,000,000 (YEN)

  • Project Year: 2011.01  -  2015.12 

    Member: TAKAHASHI Shunichi  Offer Organization: Australian Research Council

    Total: 60,000,000 (YEN)